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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Brent Goff
Anchor, DW News
KCSM 10/06/2015
Goff: On Tuesday, the European Court of Justice ruled that a 15-year-old agreement that regulates the safe transfer of data between EU nations and the U.S. is illegal. The message on the court -- European citizens cannot expect the same data protection rights they enjoy at home to be guaranteed by U.S. companies such as Facebook and Google. Now some say it is a ruling made possible by Edward Snowden's revelations. The law student that brought the case to court agrees. Mohr: The EU's top court ruled the safe harbor agreement between the U.S. and EU did not sufficiently guarantee the personal data of Europeans. It said tech companies cannot simply transfer data across the Atlantic.
Brent Goff
Anchor, DW News
KCSM 10/06/2015
Goff: Let's start with Edward Snowden. I talked to him. I interviewed him earlier this year and he said the decisions he had made had burned his life to the ground, to quote him. Would you say that this court ruling today maybe turns him into a phoenix who rises out of the ashes? Is he being given a second chance? Meyers: I think what was really clear to us, who worked in the whistleblower protection community for a long time, and these are public interest whistleblowers and GAP has been supporting and defending whistleblowers for nearly 40 years. Is that Edward Snowden's revelations have given the information citizens need to challenge government overreach. This particular decision is deeply important. Right to privacy is deeply linked to freedom of expression and we need a public debate about the limits we need to have.
Brent Goff
Anchor, DW News
KCSM 10/06/2015
They did say the Safe Harbor agreement was agreed to in 2000. A lot of the concerns and the information that Edward Snowden revealed in his whistleblower disclosures showed that world changed in the years after the Safe Harbor agreement and this is really a catch up that is being pushed onto both the regulatory authorities in the EU and obviously it has an impact on the U.S. and trade but we can't have trade without ensuring we have fundamental freedoms of the right to privacy built-in and worked through.
Brent Goff
Anchor, DW News
KCSM 10/06/2015
Goff: The student who brought this case to court said that the ruling means that surveillance, online surveillance is now illegal. Is that true? Meyers: I think for us it would be more that we hope it is the beginning of the end. This is, obviously there is a shakedown through a lot of different legal systems about what this means. Data protection isn’t necessarily easily understood by private citizens, but if we want to ensure that our data is safe from being collected without our knowledge and for reasons that we have not had an open debate about, EU citizens are very, very, they have heightened awareness about their privacy from history and this is something that I think citizens globally need to understand so we can have this debate. It would not have been possible without Edward Snowden's revelations and the way that it’s happened.
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